An in-depth Interview with Allan Engelhardt about Analytics

Cybaea

Allan Engelhardt

PJT Today’s interview is with Allan Engelhardt, co-founder and principal of insights and analytics consultancy Cybaea. Allan and I know each other from when we both worked at Bupa. I was interested to understand the directions that he has been pursuing in recent years.
PJT Allan, we know each other well, but could you provide a pen picture of your career to date and the types of work that you have been engaged in?
AE I started out in experimental physics working on (very) big data from CERN, the large research lab near Geneva, and worked there after getting my degree. Then, like many other physicists, I was recruited into financial services, in my case to do risk management. From there to a consultancy helping business make use of bleeding edge technology and then on to CRM and customer loyalty. This last move was important for me, allowing me to move beyond the technology to be as much about commercial business strategy and operations.

In 2002 a couple of us left the consultancy to help customers move beyond transactional infrastructure, which is really what ‘CRM’ was about at the time, to create high value solution on top, and to create the organizational and commercial ownership of the customer needed to consistently drive value from data, inventing the concept of Customer Value Management which is now universally implemented by telcos across the world and increasingly adopted by other industries.

PJT There is no ISO definition of either insight or analytics. As an expert in these fields, can I ask you to offer your take on the meaning of these terms?
AE To me analytics is about finding meaning from information and data, while insights is about understanding the business opportunities in that meaning. But different people use the terms differently.
PJT I must give you an opportunity to both explain what Cybaea does and how the name came about.
AE At Cybaea we are passionate about value creation and commercial results. We have been called ‘Management consultants with a black belt in data’ and we help organizations identify and act upon data driven opportunities in the areas of:

Cybaea offering

  1. Customer Value Management (CVM), including acquisition, churn, cross-sell, segmentation, and more, across online and offline channels and industries, both B2C and B2B.
  2. Customer Experience and Advocacy, including Net Promoter System and Net Promoter Economics, customer journey optimization, and customer experience.
  3. Innovation and Growth, including data-driven product and proposition development, data monetisation, and distribution and sales strategy.

For our customers, CVM projects typically deliver additional 5% EBITDA growth annually, which you can measure very robustly because much of it is direct marketing. Experience and Advocacy projects typically deliver in the region of 20% EBITDA improvement to our clients, but it is harder to measure accurately because you must go above the line for this level of impact. And for Innovation and Growth, the sky is the limit.

As for the name, we founded the company in 2002 and wanted a short domain name that was a real word. It turned out to be difficult to find an available, short ‘.com’ at the peak of the dot-bomb era! We settled on ‘cybaea’ which my Latin dictionary translated as ‘trading vessel’; historically, it was a type of merchant ship of Greek origin, common in the Mediterranean, which Cicero describes as “most beautiful and richly adorned”. We always say we want to change the name, but it never happens; I guess if it was good enough for Cicero, then it is good enough for us.

PJT While at Bupa you led work that was very beneficial to the organisation and which is now the subject of a public Cybaea case study, can you tell readers a bit more about this?
AE Certainly, and the case study is available at for anyone who wants to read more.

This was working with Bupa Global; a Bupa business unit that primarily provides international private medical insurance for 2 million customers living in over 195 different countries. Towards the end of 2013, Bupa Global set out on a strategic journey to deliver sustained growth. A key element of this was the design and launch of a completely new set of products and propositions, replacing the existing portfolio, with the objective of attracting and servicing new customer segments, complying with changing regulation and meeting customer expectations.

The strategic driver was therefore very much in the Innovation and Growth space we outlined above, and I joined Bupa’s global Leadership Team to create and lead the commercial insights function that would support this change with deep understanding of the target customers and the markets in which they live. Additionally, Bupa had very high ambitions for its Net Promoter programme (Experience and Advocacy) where we delivered the most advanced installation across the global business, and for Customer Value Management we demonstrated nearly 2% reduction in the Claims line (EBITDA) from one single project.

For the new propositions, we initially interviewed over 3,000 individuals on five continents to understand value- and purchase drivers, researched 195 markets to size demand across all customer segments, and further deep-dived into key markets to understand the competitors with products, features, and prices, as well as the regulatory environment, and distribution options. This was supported by a very practical Customer Lifetime Value model, which we developed.

Suffice to say that in two years we had designed and implemented a completely new set of propositions and taken them live in more than twenty priority markets where they replaced the old products.

The strategic and commercial results were clearly delivered. But when I asked our CEO what he thought was the main contribution of the team and the new insights function, he focused on trust: “Every major strategic decision we made was backed by robust data and deep insights in which the executive team had full confidence.”

In a period of change, trust is perhaps the key currency. Trust that you are doing the right things for the right reasons, and the ability to explain why that is. This is key to get everybody behind the changes that need to happen. This is what the scientific method applied to data, analytics, and insights can bring to a commercial organization, and it inspires me to continue what we are doing.

PJT We have both been engaged in what is now generally called the Data arena for many years, some aspects of the technology employed have changed a lot during this time. What do you think modern technology enables today that was harder to achieve in the past and are there any areas where things are much the same as they were a decade or more ago?
AE Ever since the launch of the Amazon EC2 cloud computing service in late 2006 [1], data storage and processing infrastructure has been easily and cheaply available to everybody for most practical workloads. So, for ten years you have not had any excuse for not getting your data in order and doing serious analysis.

The main trend that excites me now is the breakthroughs happening in Deep Learning and Natural Language Processing, expanding the impact of data into completely new areas. This is great for consumers and for those companies that are at the leading edge of analytics and insights. For other organizations, however, who are struggling to deliver value from data, it means that the gap between where they are versus best practice is widening exponentially, which is a big worry.

PJT Taking technology to one side, what do you think are the main factors in successfully generating insight and developing analytical capabilities that are tightly coupled with value generation?
AE Two things are always at the forefront of my mind. The first is kind of obvious, namely to start with the business value you are trying to create and work backwards from that. Too often we see people start with the data (‘I got to clean all the data in my warehouse first!’), the technology (‘We need some Big Data infrastructure!’), or the analytics (‘We need a predictive churn model!’). That is cart before the horse. Not that these things are not important; rather, that there are almost certainly a lot of opportunities you could execute right now to generate real and measurable business value and drive a faster return on your investments.

The second is to not under-estimate the business change that is needed to exploit the insights. Analytical leaders have appetite for change and they plan and resource accordingly. Data and models are only part of the project to deliver the value and they are really clear on this.

PJT Looking at the other side of the coin, what at the pitfalls to look out for and do you have any recommendations for avoiding them?
AE The flip-side of the two points previously mentioned are obvious pitfalls: not starting from the business change and value you are trying to create. And it is not easy: great data scientists are not always great commercially-minded business people and so you need the right kind of skills to bridge that gap. McKinsey talks of ‘business translators who combine data savvy with industry and functional expertise’, which is a helpful summary [2]. Less helpfully they also note that these people are nearly impossible to find, so you may need to find or grow them internally.

Which gets to a second pitfall. When thinking about generating value from data, many want to do it all themselves. And I understand why: after all, data may well be a strategic asset for your organization.

But when you recruit, you should be clear in your mind if you are recruiting to deliver the change of creating the first models and changed business processes, or if you are recruiting to sustain the change by keeping the models current and incrementally improving the insights and processes. These two outcomes require people with quite different skills and vastly different temperaments.

We call them Explorers versus Farmers.

For the first, you want commercially-focused business people who can drive change in the organization; who can make things work quickly, whether that is data, analytics, or business processes, to demonstrate value; and who are supremely comfortable with uncertainties and unknowns.

For the second, you want people who are technically skilled to deliver and maintain the optimal stable platform and who love doing incremental improvements to technology, data, and business processes.

Explorers versus Farmers. Call them what you will, but note that they are different.

PJT Many companies are struggling with how to build analytical teams. Do they grow their own talent, do they hire numerate graduates or post graduates, do they seek to employ highly skilled and experienced individuals, do they form partnerships with external parties, or is a mixture of all of these approaches sensible? What approaches do you see at Cybaea clients adopting?
AE We are mostly seeing one of two approaches: one is to do nothing and soldier on as always relying on traditional business intelligence while the other is to hire usually highly technical people to build an internal team. Neither is optimal in getting to the value.

The do-nothing approach can make sense. Not, however, when it is adopted because management fears change (change will happen, regardless) or because they feel they don’t understand data (everybody understands data if it is communicated well). Those companies are just leaving money on the table: every organization have quick wins that can deliver value in weeks.

But it may be that you have no capacity for change and have made the informed decision that data and analytics must wait, reflecting the commercial reality. The key here is ‘informed’ and the follow-on question is if there are other ways that the company can realise some of the value from data right now.

The second approach at least recognises the value potential of data and aims to move the organization towards realising that value. But it is back to those ‘business translator’ roles we discussed before and making sure you have them, as well as making sure the business is aligned around the change that will be needed. Making money from data is a business function, not a technical one, and the function that drives the change must sit within the commercial business, not in IT or some other department that is still an arms-length support function.

We see the best organizations, the analytical leaders, employing flexible approaches. They focus on the outcomes and they have a sense of urgency driven from the top. They make it work.

PJT I know that a concept you are very interested in is Analytics as a Service (AaaS). Can you tell readers some more about what this means and also the work that Cybaea is doing in this area?
AE There is a war on analytical talent and a ‘winner takes it all’ dynamic is emerging with medium-sized enterprises especially losing out. Good people want to work with good people which generates a strong network effect giving advantage to large organizations with larger analytical teams and more variety of applications. Leading firms have depth of analytical talent and can recruit, trial, and filter more candidates, leaving them with the best talent.

Our analytics-as-a-service offering is for organizations of any size who want to realise value from data and insights right now, but who are not yet ready to build their own internal teams. We partner with the commercial teams to be their (commercial) insights function and deliver not just reports but real business change. Customers can pay monthly, pay for results, or we can do a build-operate-transfer model.

One of our first projects was with a small telco. They were too small to maintain a strong analytical team in-house, purely because of scale. We set up a monthly workshop with the commercial Marketing team. We analysed their data offline and used the time for a structured conversation about the new campaigns and the new changes to the web site they should implement this month. We would point them to our reports and dashboards which had models, graphs, t-tests, and p-values in abundance, but would focus the conversation on moving the business forward.

The following month we would repeat and identify new campaigns and new changes. After six months, they had more than 20 highly effective and precisely targeted campaigns running, and we handed over the maintenance (‘farming’) of the models to their IT teams. It is a model that works well across industries.

PJT Do you have a view on how the insights and analytics field is likely to change in coming years? Are there any emerging areas which you think readers should keep an eye on?
AE Many people are focused on the data explosion that is often called the ‘Internet of Things’ but more broadly means that more data gets generated and we consume more data for our analytics. I do think this opens tremendous opportunities for many businesses and technically I am excited to get back to processing live event streams as they happen.

But practically, we are seeing more success from deep learning. We have found that once an organization successfully implements one solution, whether artificial intelligence or complex natural language processing, then they want more. It is that powerful and that transformational, and breakthroughs in these fields are further expanding the impact into completely new area. My advice is that most organizations should at least trial what these approaches can do for them, and we have set up a sister-organization to develop and deliver solutions here.

PJT What are your plans for Cybaea in coming months?
AE I have two main priorities. First, I have our long-standing partner from India in London for a couple of months to figure out how we scale in the UK. This is for the analytics as a service but also for fast projects to deliver insights or analytical tools and applications.

Second, I am looking to identify the right partners and associates for Cybaea here in the UK to allow us to grow the business. We have great assets in our methodologies, clients, and people, and a tremendous opportunity for delivering commercial value from data, so I am very excited for the future.

PJT Allan, I would like to thank you for sharing with us the benefit of your experience and expertise in data matters, both of which have been very illuminating.

Allan Engelhardt can be reached at Allan.Engelhardt@cybaea.net. Cybaea’s website is www.cybaea.net and they have social media presence on LinkedIn and Google+.
 


 
Disclosure: Neither peterjamesthomas.com Ltd. nor any of its directors have any direct financial interest in either Cybaea or any of the other organisations mentioned in this article.
 
 
Notes

 
[1]
 
https://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2006/08/24/announcing-amazon-elastic-compute-cloud-amazon-ec2—beta/
 
[2]
 
McKinsey report The Age of Analytics, dated December 2016, http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/mckinsey-analytics/our-insights/the-age-of-analytics-competing-in-a-data-driven-world


 

 

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