Do any technologies grow up or do they only come of age?

The 2016 Big Data Maturity Survey (by AtScale)

I must of course start by offering my apologies to that doyen of data experts, Stephen King, for mangling his words to suit the purposes of this article [1].

The AtScale Big Data Maturity Survey for 2016 came to my attention through a connection (see Disclosure below). The survey covers “responses from more than 2,550 Big Data professionals, across more than 1,400 companies and 77 countries” and builds on their 2015 survey.

I won’t use the word clickbait [2], but most of the time documents like this lead you straight to a form where you can add your contact details to the organisation’s marketing database. Indeed you, somewhat inevitably, have to pay the piper to read the full survey. However AtScale are to be commended for at least presenting some of the high-level findings before asking you for the full entry price.

These headlines appear in an article on their blog. I won’t cut and paste the entire text, but a few points that stood out for me included:

  1. Close to 70% [of respondents] have been using Big Data for more than a year (vs. 59% last year)
     
  2. More than 53% of respondents are using Cloud for their Big Data deployment today and 14% of respondents have all their Big Data in the Cloud
     
  3. Business Intelligence is [the] #1 workload for Big Data with 75% of respondents planning on using BI on Big Data
     
  4. Accessibility, Security and Governance have become the fastest growing areas of concern year-over-year, with Governance growing most at 21%
     
  5. Organizations who have deployed Spark [3] in production are 85% more likely to achieve value

Bullet 3 is perhaps notable as Big Data is often positioned – perhaps erroneously – as supporting analytics as opposed to “traditional BI” [4]. On the contrary, it appears that a lot of people are employing it in very “traditional” ways. On reflection this is hardly surprising as many organisations have as yet failed to get the best out of the last wave of information-related technology [5], let alone the current one.

However, perhaps the two most significant trends are the shift from on-premises Big Data to Cloud Big Data and the increased importance attached to Data Governance. The latter was perhaps more of a neglected area in the earlier and more free-wheeling era of Big Data. The rise in concerns about Big Data Governance is probably the single greatest pointer towards the increasing maturity of the area.

It will be interesting to see what the AtScale survey of 2017 has to say in 12 months.
 


 
Disclosure:

The contact in question is Bruno Aziza (@brunoaziza), AtScale’s Chief Marketing Officer. While I have no other connections with AtScale, Bruno and I did make the following video back in 2011 when both of us were at other companies.


 
Notes

 
[1]
 
Excerpted from The Gunslinger.
 
[2]
 
Oops!
 
[3]
 
Apache Hadoop – which has become almost synonymous with Big Data – has two elements, the Hadoop Distributed File Store (HDFS, the piece which deals with storage) and MapReduce (which does processing of data). Apache Spark was developed to improve upon the speed of the MapReduce approach where the same data is accessed many times, as can happen in some queries and algorithms. This is achieved in part by holding some or all of the data to be accessed in memory. Spark works with HDFS and also other distributed file systems, such as Apache Cassandra.
 
[4]
 
How phrases from the past come around again!
 
[5]
 
Some elements of the technology have changed, but the vast majority of the issues I covered in “Why Business Intelligence projects fail” hold as true today as they did back in 2009 when I wrote this piece.

 

 

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