Trouble at the top

IRM MDM/DG

Several weeks back now, I presented at IRM’s collocated European Master Data Management Summit and Data Governance Conference. This was my second IRM event, having also spoken at their European Data Warehouse and Business Intelligence Conference back in 2010. The conference was impeccably arranged and the range of speakers was both impressive and interesting. However, as always happens to me, my ability to attend meetings was curtailed by both work commitments and my own preparations. One of these years I will go to all the days of a seminar and listen to a wider variety of speakers.

Anyway, my talk – entitled Making Business Intelligence an Integral part of your Data Quality Programme – was based on themes I had introduced in Using BI to drive improvements in data quality and developed in Who should be accountable for data quality?. It centred on the four-pillar framework that I introduced in the latter article (yes I do have a fetish for four-pillar frameworks as per):

The four pillars of improved data quality

Given my lack of exposure to the event as a whole, I will restrict myself to writing about a comment that came up in the question section of my slot. As per my article on presenting in public, I try to always allow time at the end for questions as this can often be the most interesting part of the talk; for delegates and for me. My IRM slot was 45 minutes this time round, so I turned things over to the audience after speaking for half-an-hour.

There were a number of good questions and I did my best to answer them, based on past experience of both what had worked and what had been less successful. However, one comment stuck in my mind. For obvious reasons, I will not identify either the delegate, or the organisation that she worked for; but I also had a brief follow-up conversation with her afterwards.

She explained that her organisation had in place a formal data governance process and that a lot of time and effort had been put into communicating with the people who actually entered data. In common with my first pillar, this had focused on educating people as to the importance of data quality and how this fed into the organisation’s objectives; a textbook example of how to do things, on which the lady in question should be congratulated. However, she also faced an issue; one that is probably more common than any of us information professionals would care to admit. Her problem was not at the bottom, or in the middle of her organisation, but at the top.

So how many miles per gallon do you get out of that?

In particular, though data governance and a thorough and consistent approach to both the entry of data and transformation of this to information were all embedded into the organisation; this did not prevent the leaders of each division having their own people take the resulting information, load it into Excel and “improve” it by “adjusting anomalies”, “smoothing out variations”, “allowing for the impact of exceptional items”, “better reflecting the opinions of field operatives” and the whole panoply of euphemisms for changing figures so that they tell a more convenient story.

In one sense this was rather depressing, someone having got so much right, but still facing challenges. However, it also chimes with another theme that I have stressed many times under the banner of cultural transformation; it is crucially important than any information initiative either has, or works assiduously to establish, the active support of all echelons of the organisation. In some of my most successful BI/DW work, I have had the benefit of the direct support of the CEO. Equally, it is is very important to ensure that the highest levels of your organisation buy in before commencing on a stepped-change to its information capabilities.

I am way overdue employing another sporting analogy - odd however how must of my rugby-related ones tend to be non-explicit

My experience is that enhanced information can have enormous payback. But it is risky to embark on an information programme without this being explicitly recognised by the senior management team. If you avoid laying this important foundation, then this is simply storing up trouble for the future. The best BI/DW projects are totally aligned with the strategic goals of the organisation. Given this, explaining their objectives and soliciting executive support should be all the easier. This is something that I would encourage my fellow information professionals to seek without exception.
 

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